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Convert Naruto AVI Episodes to DVD

Discussion in 'Konoha TV' started by NarutoV2, Jun 10, 2005.

  1. NarutoV2 New Member

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    Well i am a newbie here so if i did something wrong sorry

    I have all naruto fansubs done by animeone or anbudom and i really enjoyed the anime, so since i have soooooooooooo much time to do things, i thought of making them play in my dvd player so i don't have to sit in front of this Stupid monitor which has bad quality. THen the real prob is this. I TRied the following: Tmpgenc,Winavi, and actually i tried soo many i forgot. Each one of them when burned to a dvd video have there subs cut off or something, like the screen was too big. Seems like the top and bottom was cut off by 1.5 inches. Isn't the a way to make them play perfectly?????? I use nero to burn and dvd lab to make menus and stuff. I also tested it in many different dvd players from relatives and friends house: koss,apex,mintek,jvc,toshiba,PS2
     
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  2. JayG Konoha's Beautiful Green Beast

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    I'm not sure that there is.

    The resolution that the subs are encoded is 640 x 480. The resolutions available for DVD format (if I'm not mistaken) are 720 x 480 and 704 x 480. Again, if I'm not mistaken, standard TV is 480 x 480.

    Based on that, you can see why the converted video seems to be "cut off". However, it isn't as bad when watching with a Widescreen TV. I've only noticed that the subs get cut off when the subs are extremely long (as in stretching from basically one end of the screen to the other). More often than not, it fits.

    But if you're watching with a regular 4:3 aspect ratio TV, you're probably out of luck.

    EDIT: You can try making them into VCDs instead...which is 352 x 240 resolution. That might fix the subtitle issue, however, because it's much lower resolution than the divx files...there is going to be a fair amount of quality loss noticeably (though it might not be too bad of a quality loss if you watch it on a TV screen that is under 20")
     
  3. dualblade New Member

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    horizontal resolution is not very important. tv's don't have pixels, they have scanlines, running horizontal, stacked on top of each other. the 640 is the horizontal resolution and 480 is the vertical, which translates into 480 scanlines (which is the tv standard). in theory, this should work out fine, especially because 640x480 is a 4:3 aspect ratio, which matches the shape of your tv. if i was you, i'd check the settings on the recompressor, because the videos aren't making it to dvd in their divx format - they are being recompressed into mpeg2, which is the dvd standard. maybe you can find something poking through the menu.

    i'm not sure why it's cutting off part of the video, but you might want to consider either getting a video card with tv-out or using your tv-out if you have that port on your card. it'd be much less frustrating than having to make dvd's for all of the naruto series, and whatever else you'd like to watch on tv. just in case you don't know what i mean, a computer has the ability to use a tv as a monitor (as well as what you have on your desk). you can use the tv for viewing videos and the regular monitor for surfing the net and typing papers. recent video cards (last few years) will let you run multimonitor configuration so you can have both the tv and pc monitor active and just drag video over to the second monitor when you want to. before i got a home theater pc, that's what i used to do.
     
  4. Negative-Ion Life is BRUTAL!!

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    yep, you might want to consider getting a S-video cable, you connected to your PC's video card and then to your TV and you watch your show on TV. Dvd is better for backing up though so i guess you also have that in mind.
     
  5. AnakinSW New Member

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    I tried using the VSO DivX to DVD software but i get the same problem, my subtitles get cut out vertically and horizontally... if a/o knows an encoder that can do this w/o pissing me off i would be thankful.
     
  6. JayG Konoha's Beautiful Green Beast

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    The thing is, the video is converted to either 704 x 480 or 720 x 480 when you convert them to DVD format. My theory is that the video is being "compressed" horizonatally that's why parts of it are cut off from each side when watching on a 4:3 TV. Now in order for the video to not look deformed while being "compressed" horizontally, the DVD player also stretches it a little bit vertically.

    Compare it to a 11 x 7.5 inch rectangular rubber that is attempting to be inserted into a 10 x 7.5 inch box. The only way to fit the rubber in that box is by "squishing" it from each horizontal side. While this allows the rubber to fit horizontally, the rubber naturally expands vertically.

    That is my theory on it.

    I have a 4:3 TV that can run 16:9 in letterbox mode. When I watch the dvds using the standard 4:3 aspect ratio of the TV, I get the same problems that he was having. Now, if I press my letterbox mode, and my TV switches to 16:9...suddenly the image is allowed to expand horizontally. Because the TV now has a 16:9 aspect ratio, it no longer needs to "compress" the video to make it fit horizontally, thus I get the full subtitles.
     
  7. dualblade New Member

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    i understand your example with the rubber, but it seems that the opposite happens with video (as rubber is finite mass and video is just light information). to use your numbers, if you had an 11x7.5 video and a 10x7.5 screen, the video should scale itself to maintain aspect ratio on the largest dimension - 11x7.5 would become 10x6.81, thereby leaving black borders on the top and bottom.

    however, it is possible that instead of "compressed" in your post, you meant zoomed. as a matter of fact, this would be a good explanation for what's happening. the recompressor is taking 640x480 and saying "hey, we need a width of 720, make the video bigger". if you just stretched the video wider, everything would be distorted so my guess is that it makes the video go from 640x480 to 720x540 (to maintain 4:3 aspect ratio). then it says, hey we need a height of 480 so it crops off some of that 540 to make it 480.

    there is a pretty easy way to test if this is what it's doing. you have to have simple editing tools; something like virtualdub will do. i'm not sure what the effect would be, it'd be something like expanding the canvas size in photoshop. do that to add black borders on the left and right sides of the video (40px wide on left and 40px wide on right) to make the video size 720x480. if my theory is right, then this would create the proper video format and the recompressor wouldn't have to do that zoom->crop process to make mpeg2.

    now all of that is really just a technical exercise, and it would be much easier to run tvout with a resolution of 640x480 so the video wouldn't have to scale at all to fill the screen
     
  8. Lammy 

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    I said this before on another thread but here goes:

    This is because on broadcast, there is a very important rule called SAFE ACTION AREAS/MARGINS as well as aspect ratios. Everyone else above has explained the aspect ratio business, so I'll get down to the more simple and correct explanation:

    The reason why half your subs are cut off are because older televisions used a process called overscan, which cuts off a portion of the outer edges of the picture, allowing the center of the picture to be enlarged. The amount of overscan is not consistent across televisions, so to make things universal, broadcasters, filmmakers, editors, cinematographers all have to obey the safe action rule. Why were there safety margins? Because most television makers back in the day were stupid.

    AnimeOne do not follow this rule... because they assume we use monitors to view their fansubs.

    Here's an image I made in Premiere suite with an inner safety margin and outer safety margin for you to compare.



    The left is AnimeOne's, and the right is DB's.


    So what can you do...

    Well, you can stop watching AnimeOne's and watch DBs.
    Or if you don't mind black borders, you can open up your Avi>Mpeg2 authoring tools and shrink the Naruto file resolution and add black borders to pad out the rest of the resolution til you can roughly guess that everything will be shown on the TV. However if you went to your mates house and played it on their TV, it'd have various results.

    Or you you can play around with your TV settings or buy a new one :\

    Hope that was informative enough for ya :)
    [/off geek mode]
     
  9. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    Well if everyone else didnt answer your question then I will, today is your lucky day. :p I have loads of anime on DVD and most are encoded from AVI to Mpeg2 (DVD format).

    Now let me tell you what to do so you will be able to fix them stretchy videos and put them on DVD and watch them on any TV.

    Since your new to this type of conversion, I'm going to do my best to break it down for you and keep it simple.

    1. Get you a burning program, I use TMPGEng. Probably one of the best for conversions, you said you used this one before so it probably wouldnt be to hard for you to get it again. I use TMPEGnc X-Press and the batch encoder (for multiple conversions).
    I am going to simulate using TMPEGnc, most encoding programs should run the same.

    2. Open up your encoding program. From the main menu, Start a New Project. Or if it already opens up a ready explorer, select the .avi video that you would like to encode to mpeg2.

    3. After selecting the .avi you wanna convert, you should be able to configure your settings for the video to be encoded to the mpeg2 format.

    Clip name: <edit to make it whatever you want the name to be>
    Video mode: < this should be 'Progressive' mode>
    Aspect Ratio: < this should be 'Pixel 10:11 (NTSC 4:3) <--standard for american TV.>
    *All other basic settings just leave default. No need for any extra tweaking.

    4. Cut-editing - use this if you wanna take out scenes or whatever to you dont want in the video.
    Example: When I make my Naruto Volumes - I take out the intro and the outro of the anime to fit more space, as well as make it look like a clean continuation when I am watching the Volume all the way through. I do add the intro to the first ep. outro to the last ep. of the Volume of course.

    5. Filter - this is the important section. Here is where you fit your video to the TV screen. Now you dont have to worry about it being different from TV to TV cause since you selected the aspect ratio from the main settings, it will size itself to the ratio of any TV, and keep the deminsions you select to fit the TV.

    6. Resize - Find a section or look for this section. This lets you change the pixel size of the image to shrink or enlarge.
    Select the custom size of the image so that you can edit the number of pixels yourself.

    - 615 x 440 pixels <---this is the screen size you want.

    7. DVD Template - of course you want it to be NTSC, so you can see it on american TV, this also works for Japan's TV system as well.

    8. Bitrate settings - the maximum bitrate you will ever need for any anime is 8000 kbits/sec, anything over this is a waste of space. And dont go too low, your quality will be crappy.

    :) And there you are, you are ready to encode, then burn to DVD and watch on a TV. :)

    Hope this answers any and all of your questions.
    Peace and im out!
     
  10. Lammy 

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    Hmm I'd kinda doubt Raiza's method would work for you though NarutoV2, but try it anyway. It all depends on how your DVD player and TV handle it. Note that when you resize down from 640x480 xVid file to a 615x440 mpeg, you're losing some information. Making the maximum bitrate at 8000 is excessive, and the xvid encode they do is less than 1500 anyway, so you'd still be losing alot.
    You can fit around 18 decent converted eps on a 4.7GB DVD.

    But technically it'd be better really to watch it on your monitor, at the same distance you would from the TV, it all looks fine to me o_o

    *me watches Naruto in bed on the monitor*
     
  11. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    Don't doubt what you haven't tried or don't know. I know what he is dealing with cause I ran into the same situation myself, which is why i researched it and figured out the problem.
    Also I know exactly what I'm doing. Not to sound big-headed or anything, but its true.
    All of the .avi encoding that are subbed are formatted the same, if they make any adjustment its minor or has nothing to do with the video size.
    So trust me, if you do it correctly, it works.

    Oh yeah, and dont make your quality 1500 or less, just keep at maximun of 8000 and it will render the video quality for you, which means you can fit 4-5 episodes on a DVD. Which is the average quality and looks real good on TV. If you go lower, you can fit more on to the DVD but it will look like static in the cartoon and it looks crappy as hell.
    *If you wanna fit more than 4-5 on a DVD at a time, there is a program called DVD Shrink. With this you can get 8 - 9 episodes on a DVD.
     
  12. Kethool lol, wut?

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    Does DVD Shrink affect the quality of the files you want to burn on DVD? Does it get worse, or anything else?
     
  13. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    No it does not affect the quality of the files at all. All DVD Shink does is act as a compression for the files. It doesn't touch the bitrate at all.
    Its kinda like a compression program that takes the files that you wanna make space for and compress them down in file size to make space for extra.
    Its a remarkable program. A lot of people like to keep there quality of there video while adding more to there DVDs. This is the program for that.
    At most DVD Shrink will allow you to add 43% more video to your DVD with the quality bitrate that you use. So lets say you encode your video at 6000 kbits/sec. You should be able to with that fit about 6 to 7 episodes of Naruto onto a DVD normally, with DVD shrink it will compress the video for you allowing you to get 12 to 13 episodes on a DVD with the same 6000 kbits/sec quality.
     
  14. KingKitega New Member

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    Hi all,

    Maybe not really helping the thread, but I had the same experience with making DVDs with the avi's. In the end I figured it was too much trouble (and time!) and bought a DivX DVD player (costs around ?35 here in UK) and plays all the avi's perfectly as a DVD data disc - and without any slight stuttering which I got when converting the avi's to DVD.

    I used VSO DivX-to-DVD (or named similarly) and DVDShrink to fit around 15 episodes - the quality was not noticably worse than fitting 6 un-DVDShrinked episodes.
     
  15. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    Yeah that is another way of doing it if you dont wanna waste the time waiting for the video to convert from .avi to mpeg2. It is time consuming. :amuse
     
  16. JayG Konoha's Beautiful Green Beast

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    615 x 440 huh? I'll have to give that a try.
     
  17. NarutoV2 New Member

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    Wow i was away for one day and soo many people replayed me without me know, i'm goin to try the encording methods tommorow though THX a lot for those who tried to help. I will try to bring back good news when it is a perfect dvd (I have loads and loads and loads of cd and dvds since i live next to bestbuy and they always have good deals just today i brought 100 dvd for $28)
     
  18. zero0one1 New Member

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    wow this was very helpful, i always wanted to put my anime on dvd's and now i basically know how.

    Does this method work for any other anime-sub, say Bleach? (im sure it doesnt though)

    Thanks a whole bunch guys, i think this thread should be sticky-ed
     
  19. Mimics New Member

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    Keep in mind that if you convert any video files into different format, the resulting video file will have slightly worse picture quality than the original itself.
     
  20. NarutoV2 New Member

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    well it doesn't matter on tv
    i tried it and it looked nice with the subtitles cuted
     
  21. Jiraiya しゃんなろ! / aka Terramare

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    I went around the internet when this happened to me and I found out that it was caused by something called "overscan" and you either have to go and adjust the TV settings in the "service mode" or you should have a DVD player that supports "underscan".
     
  22. Lammy 

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    That's okay I know what I'm talking about too. I've tried all sorts and nothing really works, for us anyway. It was cool making a few kDVDs of fine looking eps for my PAL dvd playing pals but more or less the same problem arises. I've even seeked guidance from a professional editor and encoder called Ray, nice chap, same problem.

    But if you could save me a template of your encoding options and how yours works so I can have a look I'd be greatful.
     
  23. Mimics New Member

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    I have to agree that encoding videos to DVD so that they can be shown on TV is quite hard. I read may guides regarding those issues. Many problem came up during the process.

    The way a computer monitor works is quite different than the TV monitor. In TV, we will never be able to see the total edge of an image just like BandanaDan said. The edge is cut off and it is supposed to work that way. However, on computer monitors we can actually adjust the edges of the image so that they can be fit on a screen perfectly, thus displays everything fine.
     
  24. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    Yeah sure no problem, I can do that. I am currenlty in Dayton, OH and ill be back in a week. Ill slap one together real quick and send it to ya. But remember I dont use PAL, so you may have a few extra inches on the top and bottom, but you can easily measure that and take it out. Easy fix.
    If you dont understand, then heres how easy it is. Also this is the way i figured out how to fit the video to TV anywayz.
    Make up a small clip and put it on DVD ( like 3 min or so) just to use as a guide.
    When running it on your TV, pause it and look how far it stretches. Find that exact point on your video encoder, ( use one that shows the video ).
    What you see on the TV and on the computer, look at both and measure out whats needed to make it fit.
    Just that simple.

    What video encoder are you using? That is not true. Well it is in a way, its only true if you keep your kbits/s on default which is usually lower than the original bitrate. So if your using default, then yes, but you can easily match the quality or even make it better, but it will use up more space.

    And I'm trying to figure out what you are saying? Did it work or not for you??
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2005
  25. NarutoV2 New Member

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    THIS ACTUALLY WORKS!!!! YOU DA MAN!!!!!!! Case Closed and i finnally could burn naruto dvd of my own!!!!!!!!!
     
  26. Lammy 

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    So what this procedure does is resize the image so it pads fully onto the centre of the TV, but if played back on a monitor there are borders surrounding the margins?
     
  27. Gyroscope the flavin and the mavin

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    Im new to this, so does converting the .avi to the dvd format mean u get DVD quality subs :blink :blink
     
  28. Mimics New Member

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    No, It will be the same quality as AVI but different format because the only reason you want to convert it is that so you can play it on standalone DVD players. However, even though it's the same quality but it will look better on TV because the show is made for TV. :p
     
  29. Raiza Pimp-aho-no-jitsu

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    Glad you got it going. And I know this works for everyone (except for PAL users, gotta find your own pixel deminsions).
    But if thats all I guess case is closed. :p Unless anyone else got questions, if so, I'll be around.
     
  30. Kethool lol, wut?

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    Raiza, when I'm using your method, the sound disappears. It might be that I'm doing something wrong, but I followed your solution exactly like it said, so could you help me out?
     
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