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I've been thinking

Discussion in 'Music Department' started by The Fireball Kid, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. The Fireball Kid

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    I've noticed alot of people like bands like The Killers. I've never really understood why, but I think it may be that it's music that you can dance to. I've tryed my best, and I think I've found some music that you guys might like:

    The Raven - The Stranglers

    The Raven is an album by The Stranglers, released in 1979. The album contained a few surprises: the opener is an instrumental, there is a song of just vocals and piano accompaniment, and the song "Duchess" was surprisingly poppy. The album was originally released with a limited edition 3-D cover. A further limited edition was inadvertently created when the band was forced to remove an image of Joh Bjelke-Petersen from the inner sleeve artwork. Petersen was the subject of the album's sixth track: "Nuclear Device".




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    Norfolk Coast - The Stranglers

    Norfolk Coast is an album by The Stranglers that was released on February 16, 2004. It was their first album in six years and their first studio album with new guitarist Baz Warne. A number of songs were written by Warne, including the ballad Dutch Moon. The album was well received by reviewers and fans alike, showing a return to form of the band, it also spawned the band's first Top 40 hit single for more than a decade, Big Thing Coming (# 31 Feb 2004). Norfolk Coast represents what happens when you take a band with as long a history as The Stranglers, add a new guitarist (Baz Warne) and let them work on the album for five plus years. There's not a single poor track on this release a CD that sees the carefully-crafted re-emergence of some of their signature sounds, such as Dave Greenfield's swirling keyboards, in a contemporary setting. The hard-edged title track sets the direction for much of the album, while there are more contemplative moments, such as the atmospheric "Tuckers Grave", dedicated to Edwin Tucker, who committed suicide in 1747 (and was written in the room in which he died). In a completely different direction, "Santfe Kuss" has a light, skiffle-like, approach. Definitely the first album to which you would direct a newcomer to the band.



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    The Thirds - The Thirds

    Virginia-based musician Billy Creekmore recorded The Thirds' album, Planet of Me with a certain self-described "obsessiveness." Creekmore, who wrote and played everything on the album other than bass guitar, believes that while looking back, his preoccupation with creating "big sonic backdrops" helped create a sense of depth for the listener. The music on Planet of Me is eagerly energetic, showcasing Creekmores attention to detail. "The process of recording music is equally intriguing to me as playing it, and I like to think of the studio as an instrument with infinite possibilities," Creekmore said. "That's where you can get into trouble as well. But it's the little mistakes along the way that can give you a new direction that you might never have thought of in the first place." While Creekmore may be the music-making mind behind any recorded version of The Thirds, some of his friends have come together to create the live version of the band. In person, The Thirds is Creekmore, Marc Jenkins on bass guitar and Casio, and Bryan Stiglich on percussion. Creekmore describes this union as where "The Thirds really came to life as a band, more than just sounds committed to 0's and 1's in the digital world. -NPR's Open Mic March 2006

    The Thirds homepage.
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    Embrace - Embrace [DC]

    The 1987 album Embrace was the only release of the emocore group Embrace. Dischord Records number 24 was compiled from the only two studio sessions the band recorded. The first eleven tracks were laid down in November 1985, and the other three were done in February 1986. All of the songs were recorded at Inner Ear Studios and featured the same lineup.

    Originally released on cassette tape and vinyl, it was released on CD in 1992 as Dischord number 24CD. In May 2002, the CD was re-mastered with two extra tracks, previously unreleased alternate versions of "Money" and "Dance of Days" taken from the first recording session.


    (Note: BUY THIS ALBUM! Support Dischord Records and Ian Mackaye!)



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    Red Medicine - Fugazi

    Retreating from the skinned-knee production values of In on the Kill Taker, Red Medicine packs more rhythmic punch and shows more range. With more drive and playful goings-on, the arrangements sound much looser than on Kill Taker, while remaining just as gut-kicking and brainy. The experimentation, which adds liveliness, doesn't sound measured. Even Joe Lally is allowed to sing, and it just happens to be one of the best songs on the record. Running against the theory that Fugazi is a pack of killjoys, numerous instances pop up where the band's twisted sense of humor is apparent. The sinister ha-has that open "Birthday Pony," the android sample in the pleasant (!) instrumental "Combination Lock," and random piano plinks all manage to find a welcome place. But the most uncharacteristic track is the "Blade Runner in Kingston" slo-mo instrumental "Version," featuring clarinet skronks, dubwise rhythm, incidental zaps, and -- get this -- no guitars. Picciotto declares in the immediately following "Target" that he hates the sound of guitars. What gives? It's clearly a rumination against corporate America's capitalization/bastardization of "punk" aesthetics. If anyone had the right to comment, it was Fugazi. "Back to Base" and "Downed City" (another dubby intro here) return to more standard issue, hardcore roots Fugazi, full of the soaring guitars that the band is most known for. Closing out the nearly flawless second side is yet another contemplative exit track, "Long Distance Runner." Acting as a daily affirmation of sorts to combat lethargy, MacKaye opines, "If I stop to catch my breath/I might catch a piece of death."



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    1986 - One Last Wish

    One Last Wish was a short-lived rock band from Washington, D.C. It was formed in May 1986 by members of Rites of Spring, and split up in January 1987.

    Amidst the breakup of Rites of Spring in 1986, three of its four members - Picciotto, Janney and Canty - went on to form a new band after picking up Michael Hampton, former guitarist of Faith and Embrace. With the name One Last Wish the band began playing shows in August of 1986, which were mostly in the D.C. area and included a series of benefit shows. Their sole recording was done in November of 1986 at Inner Ear Studios in Arlington, VA. It was engineered by Don Zientara and produced by Ian MacKaye, who Canty and Picciotto would later join in the band Fugazi. One Last Wish broke up shortly after mixing was completed, and as a result the album was not released until 13 years later in November of 1999, on MacKaye's Dischord Records label. Prior to this release of this record, titled 1986, only one single, "Burning in the Undertow", had been released, having been on the Dischord benefit sampler "State of the Union" (April 1989). After the band's breakup, Picciotto, Janney and Canty would reunite with Michael Fellows of Rites of Spring, taking on the new name Happy Go Licky. Hampton would go on to form the band Manifesto.




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    I was gonna say Husker Du, but's hard to name them all.

    Hope I helped you guys. :)
     
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  2. olaf

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    you gonna pimp this, or just giving recomendations?
     
  3. The Fireball Kid

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    Reccomendations. I don't have time. These are big albums.
     
  4. olaf

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    and what if I don't listen to The Killers that much? meh

    you reminded me that I wanted to DL some Fugazi. thanks
     
  5. The Fireball Kid

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    It's still good music. Not all of it sounds like the Killers.
     
  6. Sid

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    Everybody who misuses the term emo should be forced to listen to Fugazi.

    I've heard Embrace but didn't like it much. I'm not familiar with the others, but this is probably the best thread you've ever created X ;O
     
  7. The Fireball Kid

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    Thanks. I'm quite proud of it.
     
  8. Efraim Longstocking

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  9. Brother Wayne Kramer

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    you didn't like embrace?

    le strange.
     
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