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"no" (the particle) in japanese

Discussion in 'Foreign Languages' started by Sasuke_worshiper, May 29, 2007.

  1. Sasuke_worshiper Black Sharingan FC!

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    the particle "no" in japanese shows possession according to wikipedia. What i want to know is how is kage bunshin NO jutsi translated as shadow clone jutsu if there is no possession?
     
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  2. Purgatory Banned

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    Kage Bunshin No Jutsu....the Art of Shadow Clones.
     
  3. Sasuke_worshiper Black Sharingan FC!

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  4. The Black Knight Nantekotta?

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    no links most nouns in a modying relationship

    whether it be possession, nominal adjective, etc.


    I'm learning spanish, and I think it's somwhat similar to "de" in Spanish.
     
  5. MoonlitTiger Rawr!! xD

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    "No" basically means 'S in Japanese.
    Example: Naruto's Dog-> Naruto No Inu.

    But it can also mean that the second noun/verb is possesed/belongs by the first noun/verb.
    Example: RengeAcademy-> Renge No Akademi(Academy).
    There is no real possesion here but 'Academy' falls behind 'Renge'. It's hard to explain though, but basically it's the Academy of Renge.
    Or in your case 'Shadow Clone Technique' - Kage Bushin(Shadow Clone) No Justu(technique).
    The word "Technique" belongs to "Shadow Clone" because it can also be said as "Technqiue of Shadow Clones"

    I hoped that helped. If I did, please +Rep, thanks.
     
  6. The Black Knight Nantekotta?

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    The more and more spanish I learn the closer and closer no seems to be in meaning with the spanish particle "de"

    profesor de espanol
    supeingo no sensei
     
  7. Rastignac Member

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    In a lot case の/no could be the equivalent of "de" in Spanish bit it's wrong to assume that they have always the same meaning.

    For exemple if you want to say "a French student" (ie: a student who is French), in Japanese the sentence would be: フランス人の学生 // "Furansu jin no Gakusei" but in Spanish you would say: "un estudiante francés" because if you say "un estudiante de francés" the sentence means "a student who's learning French" -> フランス語の学生 // "Furansu go no Gakusei".

    An other exemple if you want to say "my book" in Japanese you say 私の本 // watashi no hon" but in Spanish it's "mi libro".

    Basically の/no particle have 2 main functions in Japanese:

    1 - indicating a relation of possession.

    Ex:
    私の本/車/など... "watashi no hon/kuruma/nado...
    -> My book/car/etc...

    父の時計 // "chichi no tokei"
    -> My father's watch.

    2 - indicating a relation of determination between 2 nouns (and it could be about various things like indicating the sort, the origin, the quantity, the era etc...).

    Ex:
    鶏の卵 // niwatori no tamogo
    -> a hen egg

    毛糸の手袋 // keito no tebukuro
    -> Wool gloves

    新潟の米 // Niigata no kome
    -> Niigata'as rice

    着物の女性 // kimono no josei
    -> The girl in kimono

    二台の車 // ni dai no kuruma
    -> Two cars

    江戸時代の城 // Edo jidai no shiro
    -> A castle of the Edo era

    So following the case の/no could be translate by various thing like my/his/'s/of etc... there's not really an equivalent for it in English.

    I hope this somehow comprehensible as neither English nor Japanese is my first language it's kinda hard to explain this properly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2007
  8. Luiz Well-Known Member

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    Jiraiya always says "nooo..." in the end of his lines.What does it mean?
     
  9. The Black Knight Nantekotta?

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    @Rastignac
    Yes, I know. I speak Japanese and English fluently and am learning Spanish.

    I know there are some differences, but notice how I said it's really close in meaning, not same meaning. As no in Japanese basically connects two nouns, so does de.
     
  10. Rastignac Member

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    They are often very close in term of the function of "connecting two nouns" but the thing is that "no" cover more fields than "de" for example: 着物の女性 would be "la muchacha en kimono" in Spanish.

    And moreover "no" could also play the role of the "adjetivos posesivos" (mi,tu,su, nustro, vuestro and mio,tuyo etc...) which is something totally different.

    But I guess that from an English native speaker POV they are indeed a strong similarity between "no" and "de" in one of his function because there's not really an equivalent for it English.
     
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