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Texas mayor resigns after telling residents desperate for power and heat "only the strong will survive"

i still think we should have called teh military to help texas. They have the equipment and training to survive harsh weather off grid, why couldn't we have helped the texans?
Because they voted Republican.

That would have been Trump's strategy. And then tweet at how inefficient they are without government help.
 

stream

Do something, Naruto!
This fucking country I just... I can't

TikTok Users Attempt to Push Conspiracy Theory Claiming the Snow in Texas Is Fake​

Yeah, that's where I'm starting to conspiracy the conspiracists. Like the whole Qanon thing, actually. I think there's a good chance that people are just trolling with the most ridiculous theories they can imagine, and more trolls join to pile up on the fun; then maybe after a while there's a bunch of total Marjories morons who actually start believing it. It's very much like flat earth groups: The vast majority of people on these groups are just trolling, and there is a tiny small number of people on them who actually gobble it all.
 

WorkingMoogle

Well-Known Member
The fake snow is just for the pictures. There's no actual snow in Texas. Texas was used with a targeted microwave burst to attack water and power infrastructure.

The Deep State took the information from the fake Covid lockdown to realize that all the rough and tumble militia groups fall apart without modern comforts very quickly so this is prepping for phase two of their elimination.
 

Jim

Normal Person
The fake snow is just for the pictures. There's no actual snow in Texas. Texas was used with a targeted microwave burst to attack water and power infrastructure.

The Deep State took the information from the fake Covid lockdown to realize that all the rough and tumble militia groups fall apart without modern comforts very quickly so this is prepping for phase two of their elimination.
Don't give people conspiracy ideas!
j/k
 

hammer

Well-Known Member
> tells Republicans don't get the vaccine
> turns the power off on the poor during an ice storm
> all the Republicans die because generally Democratic have more money for situations like this
>Republican dosent get reelected because all the Republican voters are dead
>surprised Pikachu face
 

Subarashii

Obaa-chan
Beanie babies are so 90's.

Well yes because I am French-Canadian, but the Anglo-Normans also imported zed to Canada because we don't lazily drop the u and letters out of Zed.

We are civilized up north.

aint that right @Natty

Except the word "color" comes from the Latin word "color" and Old French "color" so you're just adding 'u's where they needn't be :gun
Or "favor"
c. 1300, "attractiveness, beauty, charm" (archaic), from Old French favor "a favor; approval, praise; applause; partiality" (13c., Modern French faveur), from Latin favorem (nominative favor) "good will, inclination, partiality, support," coined by Cicero from stem of favere "to show kindness to," from PIE *ghow-e- "to honor, revere, worship" (cognate: Old Norse ga "to heed").
 

Subarashii

Obaa-chan
Middle English: from Old French colour (noun), colourer (verb), from Latin color (noun), colorare (verb).

Coleur en français moderne.
I literally just said that.
But if you're gonna mansplain my own post to me, here you go :gun

color (n.)​

early 13c., "skin color, complexion," from Anglo-French culur, coulour, Old French color "color, complexion, appearance" (Modern French couleur), from Latin color "color of the skin; color in general, hue; appearance," from Old Latin colos, originally "a covering" (akin to celare "to hide, conceal"), from PIE root (1) "to cover, conceal, save." Old English words for "color" were hiw ("hue"), bleo. For sense evolution, compare Sanskrit varnah "covering, color," which is related to vrnoti "covers," and also see .
Colour was the usual English spelling from 14c., from Anglo-French. Classical correction made color an alternative from 15c., and that spelling became established in the U.S. (see ).
Meaning "a hue or tint, a visible color, the color of something" is from c. 1300. As "color as an inherent property of matter, that quality of a thing or appearance which is perceived by the eye alone," from late 14c. From early 14c. as "a coloring matter, pigment, dye." From mid-14c. as "kind, sort, variety, description." From late 14c. in figurative sense of "stylistic device, embellishment. From c. 1300 as "a reason or argument advanced by way of justifying, explaining, or excusing an action," hence "specious reason or argument, that which hides the real character of something" (late 14c.).
From c. 1300 as "distinctive mark of identification" (as of a badge or insignia or livery, later of a prize-fighter, horse-rider, etc.), originally in reference to a coat of arms. Hence figurative sense as in show one's (true) colors "reveal one's opinions or intentions;" compare .
In reference to "the hue of the darker (as distinguished from the 'white') varieties of mankind" [OED], attested from 1792, in people of colour, in translations from French in reference to the French colony of Saint-Domingue (modern Haiti) and there meaning "mulattoes."
In reference to musical tone from 1590s. Color-scheme is from 1860. Color-coded is by 1943, in reference to wiring in radios and military aircraft. Color-line in reference to social and legal discrimination by race in the U.S. is from 1875, originally referring to Southern whites voting in unity and taking back control of state governments during Reconstruction (it had been called white line about a year earlier, and with more accuracy).

color (v.)
late 14c., colouren, "to make (something) a certain color, to give or apply color to," also figurative "to use (words) to a certain effect; to make (something) appear different from reality or better than it is," from Old French culurer, colorer, and directly from Latin colorare, from color (see (n.)). Intransitive sense "become red in the face" is from 1721. Related: ; .
 
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